The Settler

Posted filed under .


Black Comedy
Comic Drama
Drama
Psychological Drama
Thriller-Horror
Subject:
Crisis
Dispossession
Family
Friendship
Human Soul
Love
Refugees
Relationships
The Other

Text in:

he English

This dark comedy begins with a knock on the door in the middle of the night. Ezra, a disabled man, paralyzed from the waist down, has come to visit Dan, his onetime friend, and his pregnant wife, Maya. Ezra has just lost his father, who died out of strange, perhaps violent, circumstances, the morning before and now expects to be taken care of by Dan and Maya. He doesn’t speak much, nor moves, but he will not leave. This process of settlement drives the couple crazy, opening anew traumatic wounds in their relationship. As time goes by, Maya understands that in order to salvage her marriage, she will have to get rid of the “discomfort” that lives with them, the same “discomfort” that will never vacate the premises peacefully.

The characters

Female:1 Male:2 Total:3

Dan, a Man in his mid-thirties.

Karen, Dan’s wife, in her late Twenties,

Ezra, same age as Dan.

Translations

English

Productions

Premierre

2015 Kvutsat Avoda {work group) Ensemble , Tmoona Theatre director: Yigael Sachs
Production page

Critics

"It is a thought provoking play, well written and even brilliant in his ability to supply an in-depth psychological portrait of the three characters, " Zvi Goren, Habama.   "In Noam Gil's plays, dramaturgical models, mostly borrowing from Anglo-American culture, are successfully weaved, reminding us of Samuel Beckett, Harold Pinter, Edward Albee, Sarah Kane, David Mamet and the Coen Brothers. His talent to listen to characters in dire circumstances (without breaking the rules of probability) and to speak through them is superb, fresh and direct. The circumstances which Noam chooses to illustrate are meticulously constructed in their ability to resurface deep, repressed and terrifying emotions regarding the "others," the "undesirables," the ghosts and demons that were swiped beneath the carpet for a long time and now reemerge as monsters," Eitan Bloom, Haaretz   "A disturbing and unsettling play that haunts you long after the curtain goes down," Shai Bar Yaakov, Yedioth Ahronoth.

Posted by & filed under .