How’s the Beast?

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A-genre
New Writing

Text in:

he English

 Eyal Weiser’s “How’s the Beast?”
features three new fictional artists – a Polish choreographer, a German-Israeli
artist, and an Israeli performance artist. Working against the backdrop of
Operation Protective Edge, the artists each create an artwork in response to an
article published in the summer of 2014 in a German newspaper, which expressed
concerns regarding Israel’s policy in Gaza.

 

Combining dance, video, and performance art and making use of a
range of artistic tools and a special performative syntax, the three artists
examine the normalization of relations among their countries, as well as the
evolution of collective narratives following the Second World War. The
German-Israeli video artist Uriah Rhein-Merchav’s work is concerned with the
co-dependent relations created between victim and perpetrator; the Polish
choreographer Agnieszka Tz’zak creates a confessional performance that explores
how Polish and Israeli societies come to terms with feelings of guilt; and the
radical performance artist Liora Alshech, the soloist of the band Liora and the
Schwarz Schwa
̈nze, is concerned with the enchanting, mesmerizing, spectacular
effect of the war.

The characters

Female:0 Male:0 Total:0

Translations

Chinese, English, Polish

Productions

Premierre

2015

Critics

  "…a clear anti-war message, and moreover, a political stance that stands out beyond the aesthetic and artistic challenges it poses itself and its audience…true accomplishment". (Habama magazine)

"In the theatre world there's a constant bewilderment regarding the disappearance of political plays from the Israeli stage and their substitution with 'bread and circuses'. To paraphrase, one may say that one image of an animalistic woman giving birth to the sorrows of war that Weiser offers is worth a thousand words, and that's just one of three parts in his condensed, multi-layered show dealing with war.

Witty text... The audience seemed dazed from the intensity of the images and couldn't quite get off their seats and leave the theatre".  (Erev Rav Art Magazine)

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